• About Jacob

    Jacob started Fantasy Football Fools in 2007 as a outlet for all the fantasy football conversations he couldn't have in-person. Since then, well...it's only gotten worse.

    http://www.fantasyfootballfools.com

    What You Missed This Offseason: Late Game Kickoffs Moved Back 10 Minutes

    by  • September 9, 2012 • News • 0 Comments

    The announcement came down in June, but if you don’t follow football 24/7, you may not have heard that the NFL put an end to one of the biggest Sunday afternoon frustrations. Afternoon games will now start 10 minutes later to give us a chance to see any fourth quarter heroics at the end of the early games.

    The NFL has announced that kickoffs for late games will be moved back 10 minutes, from 4:15 ET to 4:25. That’s because the NFL’s arcane broadcast rules have forced viewers to be switched away from the ends of games, often very exciting ends, to catch the start of the second game featuring their territorial home team. According to the league, that’s happened 44 times over the past three seasons.

    No need for angry tweets about missing the final minutes? Now what am I supposed to do between games…

    Injuries are more random than your brain might think

    by  • September 7, 2012 • Injury Updates • 0 Comments

    Despite his doucheyness, I am a big fan of  Fantasy Douche’s thoughtful perspective on the fantasy football game and how we perceive it. On that note, I’ll highlight a great point he made this preseason in explaining recency bias in terms of calling players injury prone.  In many cases, our brains are fooling us.

    The problem is this:   If a player has had a lot of recent injuries then our expectation is that they will have a lot more.  If a player hasn’t had many recent injuries then our expectation is that they will remain healthy.  That’s as complicated as our thinking process gets and I don’t think it’s particularly enlightened or anything that we should be putting a lot of stock in.

    You can’t go back and change how you drafted this season, but let Douche’s words sink in this season. And ponder this…if recency bias affects the way we think of players as injury prone, how does it affect who we decide to grab off the waiver wire? And how does it influence us to jump on the wrong players when they have a big week only to be disappointed by their lack of production after that breakout performance?

    Brandon Lloyd, Fred Davis, and The 2012 Quarterback Craze

    by  • September 4, 2012 • Draft Strategy • 0 Comments

    I’m late to the party, but Lance Zierlein of The Sideline View hosted this Google+ Hangout with two of the great minds in fantasy football, Sigmund Bloom and Matt Waldman, to discuss the most overrated and underrated players as we close out the 2012 fantasy football draft season.

    Their conversation touches on early hype for quarterbacks this season, Dallas Cowboys concerns, and why you should avoid taking wide receivers in the first two rounds. I also like what Zierlein, Waldman, and Bloom say about Brandon Lloyd as they break down the Patriots 2012 offense considering Lloyd was one of my big targets this year.

    If you still have any drafts, there are a few strategy points made throughout this video, including drafting based on how you value a player rather than consensus value, which is something you have to learn if you want to get the guys you really like on your roster. It’s lengthy but worth the watch as you prepare for your final drafts or evaluate your roster for the season ahead.

    Don’t let Russell Wilson start the year on your waiver wire

    by  • September 3, 2012 • Waiver Wire • 0 Comments

    If you’re looking for a bang-or-bust QB2 to stash behind an elite QB1, put a claim in on Russell Wilson. The Seattle offense may not be explosive, but Wilson showed his ability to produce big fantasy weeks this preseason. If he does surprise us all by Cam Newton-ing the first few weeks of the season, you’re going to want to have him on your roster.

    As Fantasy Douche explained in his thinking on quarterbacks:

    The thing about quarterbacks who will tuck the ball and run is that they’re like a waterbed. Push it down in one spot and it pops up in another. They’ll pass first if they can, but if their receivers are covered or if they’re unsure, they’ll just run and get a first down. It doesn’t take very long to rack up 40 rushing yards when the QB does this.

    There’s a lot to like about the rookie quarterback no matter how the Seattle offense comes together. So even if you already have two quarterbacks on your roster, consider stashing Wilson for the first few weeks of the season.