You Benched Larry Fitzgerald?

Larry Fitzgerald looks hot, AS USH

http://youtu.be/iZ8Qb9qm7N4

There are two schools of thought around whether I was stupid or gutsy this weekend. Regardless, I was certainly LOFTY. On one side, you have the more traditional view that you should “never sit your studs,” a stance I’ve taken in the past.

Leonard Hankerson

And the other side of the argument is the “play the matchups” contingent, the ones who throw statistics at you to convince you it’s time to let your hot player ride the bench.

I played the matchups this weekend, and it came back to bite me. Oh, did it bite.

To my credit, Leonard Hankerson was slotted to start in place of Pierre Garcon. As the X receiver, he should have been Robert Griffin III’s first read on most plays, and I expected to see him go off against a woeful Bengals defense.

Instead, I got 56 receiving yards, good for 5.6 points. You could say that’s not bad for a flex play, but when the player that would have started in his place in Larry Fitzgerald…

Facing a pretty terrible matchup against the sometimes challenging Eagles secondary, Fitzgerald was dangerous with Kevin Kolb under center. Kolb hasn’t exactly looks Fitzgerald’s way, and though they said they’d try to get Fitz the ball, I didn’t think Kolb would make it happen this week.

But he did.

Fitzgerald racked up 114 yards against the Eagles and made it into the  end zone  to reward his owners for the first time this season. I missed it because, ironically, I was  desperate  for a win and looking for points wherever I could get them.

What We Should Learn From This

Start your studs. Play your matchups. The choice is yours. But the lesson I learned in Week 3 (again) is to never sit a stud for a longshot play.

0-3, here I come.

H/T Kissing Suzy Kolber for video

Free Handcuffs with every frame bed

Unleash the Handcuffs: Andre Brown, Bilal Powell, Daryl Richardson are Week 3 Pickups

Free Handcuffs with every frame bed
Week 2 brought the injuries, now didn’t it? I can’t say I enjoyed watching Steven Jackson sit through the second half…especially after he was doing so well before he sat down.

Aaron Hernandez owners may still crying after seeing him go back to the locker room without putting any points on the board. Of all the less serious injuries, Ahmad Bradshaw’s neck injury seems to be the only one that hasn’t been clarified since the games were played.

But let’s not dwell on the negative. I did that already this week.

Let’s get better. Say it together…WITH FEELING!

Just like last week, these are presented in the order I’d go after them. Dollar dollar bill FAAB suggestions are also listed beside each player.

Week 3 Pickups

Mikel Leshoure, RB, Lions (<5%)
If no one owns him yet, you should be able to pick him up on the cheap. Kevin Smith doesn’t have the full confidence of this team. That much we could see as the Lions went with Joique Bell on several touches in Week 2. There’s a good chance Leshoure returns in Week 3 and makes this job all his own, and Lions RBs are good for fantasy points.

Andre Brown, RB, Giants (10%)
When Ahmad Bradshaw went down, we all expected to see David Wilson. Instead, we got Brown as the workhorse back, and he performed well. He’ll be the RB to own if Bradshaw misses any time this week and probably keeps a good portion of the work if Bradshaw misses additional time. Wilson’s got some work to do to get himself out of the doghouse.

Martellus Bennett, TE, Giants (5%)
Bennett has quickly become the third option in this Giants’ offense and one of the top tight end options through the first two weeks. Make sure he’s not in the pool, especially if you’re sitting on a lesser option like Fred Davis.

Dennis Pitta, TE, Ravens (5%)
He’s getting a ton of looks in this offense. While some of it may be game plan, two weeks is enough to notice the trend, which makes him worth a grab. The rumor is that he’s Flacco’s best friend on the team, and you know how that works out for tight ends. *COUGH* Witten *COUGH* I’d look to fill your Aaron Hernandez hole with Pitta or Bennett this week.

Kyle Rudolph, TE, Vikings (<5%)
You’re still letting this guy sit on the waiver wire? He’s on the radar after scoring this week, and I expect his big breakout game to happen sooner rather than later.

Greg Little, WR, Browns (0%)
He lives. But the Browns aren’t going to be producing like this week to week. Still, if you’re looking for a WR3 with potential, he’s worth stashing in all leagues for bye weeks and potential garbage time production.

Brent Celek, TE, Eagles (0%)
Celek might not have as high a ceiling as the tight ends listed above, but he still might be an upgrade for Fred Davis owners/sufferers.

Bilal Powell, RB, Jets (0%)
Powell has been on my watch list all season. When Shonn Greene went out of the game, he took the carries and did more with them. Powell’s worth stashing as we wait for the Jets to look past Greene on the depth chart for something with a little more punch.

Daryl Richardson, RB, Rams (0%)
When Jackson didn’t return after his ball-spiking penalty in the second quarter, we all thought he was being punished. Turns out, it was only his fantasy owners getting the punishment as Jackson suffered a groin injury that prevented him from reentering the game. It was Richardson, not Isaiah Pead, who took over the game for the Rams when Steven Jackson went down. We can safely say that Richardson is the handcuff for Jackson, and he’ll be the RB to own if Jackson can’t go in Week 3. For now, all signs point to Jackson being back in the lineup Week 3, which makes Richardson just a stash.

Sam Bradford, QB, Rams (0%)
So maybe the Rams aren’t so terrible? I’m undecided, but Bradford certainly had good numbers against the Redskins. Washington suffered several injuries on the defensive side of the ball in this one, which took some pressure off of the Rams offensive line that needed the help. In short, swap your backup QB out for Bradford if you’re worried about your current guy.

Andy Dalton, QB, Bengals (0%)
I know he had a good showing against the Browns, but I just don’t think Dalton is dependable as anything more than a QB2. That said, you might look to Dalton during the bye weeks if your QB2 isn’t looking so hot.

WATCH LIST

Andrew Hawkins, WR, Bengals
The shifty wide receiver has made his mark two weeks in a row now. He’s worth keeping on your radar as a potential WR3, and he is worth stashing if you’re in a PPR league.

Jackie Battle, RB, Chargers
I see Battle’s stats from this week as a flash in the pan just before the return of Ryan Mathews. When Mathews takes the field, I don’t think we’ll see Battle get this many touches. His usage in Week 2 is probably a result of how little Ronnie Brown has left in the tank. If Mathews doesn’t return in Week 3 or goes down with another injury, keep your eye on Battle.

Monday Morning Therapy: Steven Jackson’s groin hates fantasy football

I’d like to try something a little different here at Fantasy Football Fools.

I give you a lot of advice, good and bad, throughout the season, but what about all the anger management we have to endure? Injuries. Benchings. When your team leaves you hanging Sunday, there’s got to be some good way to vent.

For that, I’d like to bring you Monday Morning Therapy — conveniently published on Tuesday this time around…but maybe we’ll get better at that.

Let me know what you think and join in on the comments. If you like this feature, I’ll try to keep it going throughout the season.

Chris Johnson. There’s a good place to start (or not start, many Johnson owners might say). Can anyone find Chris Johnson’s fantasy points? I think we lost them back in 2010. He’s jumpy behind the line and has nowhere to go. I’m starting to feel like he’s a dud again this season.

While we’re on the subject of Johnsons, Andre had a pretty terrible game as well, but when you play the Jaguars and have Arian Foster and Ben Tate to feed, there’s not really any reason to throw the ball. I can understand that, but can A.J.’s fantasy owners?

After a brilliant Week 1, Tony Romo looked pretty much just like this in Week 2. This is why we can’t have nice things.

Steven Jackson is a beast, but beasts run so hard that they injure their own groin. That groin prevented him from getting into the end zone from the 1 in the second quarter Sunday. And after that disappointment and the thunder spike that got him penalized, Jackson couldn’t get back into the game. In his stead, Daryl Richardson ran for 83 yards with 19 yards receiving.

THOSE ARE JACKSON’S POINTS. What would have put Jackson up for a 10+ fantasy day instead becomes waiver wire fodder that probably won’t pan out any other week this season.

Meanwhile, Jackson’s younger counterpart in running-back-on-a-terrible-team purgatory did this. I’m going to regret drafting Jackson, aren’t I?

I would have been better off drafting Reggie Bush.

Larry Fitzgerald hasn’t impressed so far this year, and it made sense with Skelton going down in Week 1 and Kolb returning to center without the reps. But in Week 2, we expected Fitz to produce against the Patriots. At least for more than his 1 catch for 4 yards in a historically bad Fitzgerald performance.

Victor Cruz seemed to bounce back just fine from a bad Week 1. Why can’t you do it too, Larry?

Who ruined your Week 2 victory? Who left you with a big ZERO in the points column? Sound off in the comments.

Week 2 Starts to Sit Well With Me: Milk Was a Bad Choice

Is your fantasy team starting to make you feel like this?

It’s getting a little rough out of there after only one week of play. So how about we get to a better place in Week 2?

For the most part, you should stick to your guns this week and see if your team rises into the fantasy juggernaut you thought you drafted in Week 2, but there are a few situations worth worrying about.

Matchups That Scare Me This Week:

Michael Vick vs. Ravens. As bad as Vick looked against the Browns, this game could be even worse. He’s probably better than he showed in Week 1, but when is he going to be that guy again? I think you’re stuck starting him if you drafted him as an elite option, but brace yourself.

Chris Johnson vs. Chargers.  I’m not sure if it’s his instincts or his offensive line, but it’s looking like another looooong year for Chris Johnson owners. The Chargers slowed down Darren McFadden in Week 1 and could easily keep Johnson at bay. Chances are he’s another player you just have to start because of where you had to draft him, and we’ll just have to hope he finds his rhythm in Week 2.

Trent Richardson vs. Bengals. It’s tough to be a Brown right now. That’s about all you can say.

Michael Turner vs.  Broncos. I’m not alone in doubting Turner, and a Denver no huddle attack led by Peyton Manning should force the Falcons into a hurried no huddle of their own. Turner won’t do much for you this week unless he finds the  end zone. Jacquizz Rodgers is the Atlanta running back to own this season, but he probably needs another week or two to ripen.

For a more upbeat look at starts and sits for Week 2, I’m throwing it to Footballguys TV.

Good luck…and avoid the milk this Sunday.

Turner looked slow and unable to break even arm tackles. He isn’t a threat to contribute in the passing game, so you’re only real hope is that he picks up enough touchdowns to stay fantasy relevant. The Falcons had eight snaps inside the Chiefs’ 10 yard line on Sunday and Turner had one carry. If you have a way to get rid of him for anything of value, do it now.

Heath Cummings  of Footballguys.com on Michael Turner’s slow start to the season in Week 1

Redskins RB Alfred Morris

Week 2 Waiver Wire Pickups: Are you who we thought you were?

Redskins RB Alfred MorrisIt was an unusual Week 1, but at least with surprises comes a list of potential pickups to improve our fantasy teams.

Below I’ve listed some players you might consider claiming this week if they are not owned in your leagues. I’ve listed them in the order of preference, but I’ve also guesstimated what percentage of your free agent acquisition budget (FAAB) you should spend on them.

If you look closely at the percentages, you’ll notice I’ve alloted lower bids for some players who appear high on my list — most notably,  Jeffery and Hill this week. Those players are the ones I consider waiver wire bargains.

You may have to bid more for them if you are really determined to have a specific player, but with no consistency established after just one week, you could try to get a steal by bidding the same low amount on many of these pickups and settling for what you get.

I’ll assume for the purposes of this waiver wire that C.J. Spiller was drafted in all  leagues, but if he, for some reason, is on the market, you know what to do — go get him. He may cost you a good chunk of your FAAB to obtain, but he will probably be worth 50% or more of your budget if your willing to pay that price.

In order of preference…

Alfred Morris, RB, Redskins (25%)
We’ve got some Shanahanigans in here! We would be remiss not including Washington’s leading rusher. While he’s nothing special, the Redskins’ running back will always produce. He’s a must add, but don’t risk more than 25% of your FAAB in obtaining him. You may want to sell high after he feasts on the Rams next week before he does something Shanny doesn’t approve of and rides the bench the rest of the year.

Randall Cobb, WR, Packers (15-25%)
The Packers have finally found a way to get Cobb more involved in the offense — putting him in the backfield. While he didn’t record any carries, the hybrid role they have for Cobb is worth noting. He could emerge as one of the 2012 fantasy football surprises by season’s end.

Alshon Jeffery, WR, Bears (5%)
Jeffery has immediately become a piece of the Bears passing game, which looked productive in Week 1. He won’t be a regular contributor for your fantasy team, but he should flirt with WR3 value that could mature into more throughout his rookie season.

Stephen Hill, WR, Jets (5%)
While raw, Hill saw several targets from Sanchez in his rookie regular season debut. He may not score twice every week, but he should be owned to see if his hot start turns into a trend.

Kevin Ogletree, WR, Cowboys (10-15%)
As  I’ve already explained, I have my doubts about Ogletree. Don’t blow your whole FAAB budget on him, but feel free to invest 10-15% to see what he can do the rest of the way. I suspect a healthier Jason Witten and less favorable matchup will minimize Ogletree’s role in the Dallas offense.

James Jones, WR, Packers (10%)
With Greg Jennings expected to miss Week 2, Jones should see an increased role. He’s sporadically dependable, but he should be involved and involved early if Jennings sits.

Austin Collie, WR, Colts (<5%)
He didn’t play this week, but he should be on the field in Week 2 and ready to contribute. While Reggie Wayne got all the targets in Week 1, Collie could easily takeover the No. 1 spot if he can stay on the field this year. At the price of a waiver wire pick, he’s a must stash and shouldn’t cost you much of your FAAB if you get on him before the rest of your league.

Jonathan Dwyer, RB, Steelers (5%)
He proved his value this week, but the running back situation is so muddy in Pittsburgh that I wouldn’t fight to get a piece of him.

Mikel Leshoure, RB, Lions (<5%)
Now is also the time to stash the Lions’ potential  power back  while he’s still on suspension. Move now and save the FAAB dollars for another bid.

Dexter McCluster, WR/RB, Chiefs (<5%)
The Chiefs offense is not as explosive as other options, but McCluster should receive plenty of targets this year from Matt Cassel. He should be owned in all PPR leagues.

I’ll end with this video from Footballguys TV so we can all compare notes.