Redskins RB Alfred Morris

Week 2 Waiver Wire Pickups: Are you who we thought you were?

Redskins RB Alfred MorrisIt was an unusual Week 1, but at least with surprises comes a list of potential pickups to improve our fantasy teams.

Below I’ve listed some players you might consider claiming this week if they are not owned in your leagues. I’ve listed them in the order of preference, but I’ve also guesstimated what percentage of your free agent acquisition budget (FAAB) you should spend on them.

If you look closely at the percentages, you’ll notice I’ve alloted lower bids for some players who appear high on my list — most notably,  Jeffery and Hill this week. Those players are the ones I consider waiver wire bargains.

You may have to bid more for them if you are really determined to have a specific player, but with no consistency established after just one week, you could try to get a steal by bidding the same low amount on many of these pickups and settling for what you get.

I’ll assume for the purposes of this waiver wire that C.J. Spiller was drafted in all  leagues, but if he, for some reason, is on the market, you know what to do — go get him. He may cost you a good chunk of your FAAB to obtain, but he will probably be worth 50% or more of your budget if your willing to pay that price.

In order of preference…

Alfred Morris, RB, Redskins (25%)
We’ve got some Shanahanigans in here! We would be remiss not including Washington’s leading rusher. While he’s nothing special, the Redskins’ running back will always produce. He’s a must add, but don’t risk more than 25% of your FAAB in obtaining him. You may want to sell high after he feasts on the Rams next week before he does something Shanny doesn’t approve of and rides the bench the rest of the year.

Randall Cobb, WR, Packers (15-25%)
The Packers have finally found a way to get Cobb more involved in the offense — putting him in the backfield. While he didn’t record any carries, the hybrid role they have for Cobb is worth noting. He could emerge as one of the 2012 fantasy football surprises by season’s end.

Alshon Jeffery, WR, Bears (5%)
Jeffery has immediately become a piece of the Bears passing game, which looked productive in Week 1. He won’t be a regular contributor for your fantasy team, but he should flirt with WR3 value that could mature into more throughout his rookie season.

Stephen Hill, WR, Jets (5%)
While raw, Hill saw several targets from Sanchez in his rookie regular season debut. He may not score twice every week, but he should be owned to see if his hot start turns into a trend.

Kevin Ogletree, WR, Cowboys (10-15%)
As  I’ve already explained, I have my doubts about Ogletree. Don’t blow your whole FAAB budget on him, but feel free to invest 10-15% to see what he can do the rest of the way. I suspect a healthier Jason Witten and less favorable matchup will minimize Ogletree’s role in the Dallas offense.

James Jones, WR, Packers (10%)
With Greg Jennings expected to miss Week 2, Jones should see an increased role. He’s sporadically dependable, but he should be involved and involved early if Jennings sits.

Austin Collie, WR, Colts (<5%)
He didn’t play this week, but he should be on the field in Week 2 and ready to contribute. While Reggie Wayne got all the targets in Week 1, Collie could easily takeover the No. 1 spot if he can stay on the field this year. At the price of a waiver wire pick, he’s a must stash and shouldn’t cost you much of your FAAB if you get on him before the rest of your league.

Jonathan Dwyer, RB, Steelers (5%)
He proved his value this week, but the running back situation is so muddy in Pittsburgh that I wouldn’t fight to get a piece of him.

Mikel Leshoure, RB, Lions (<5%)
Now is also the time to stash the Lions’ potential  power back  while he’s still on suspension. Move now and save the FAAB dollars for another bid.

Dexter McCluster, WR/RB, Chiefs (<5%)
The Chiefs offense is not as explosive as other options, but McCluster should receive plenty of targets this year from Matt Cassel. He should be owned in all PPR leagues.

I’ll end with this video from Footballguys TV so we can all compare notes.

Robert Turbin, Austin Collie, and More Players Who Should Be Owned in Week 1

I thought I’d let Cecil Lammey kick off this year’s waiver wire discussion with  this video for Footballguys  TV. To give you a little more to work with, here’s my list of players who should be on more rosters to start the season.

Quarterbacks

  • Jake Locker, QB, Titans   — What’s not to like about a young, athletic QB with plenty of weapons at his disposal and an explosive offense?
  • Russell Wilson, QB, Seahawks   — As I’ve already mentioned this preseason, running quarterbacks are always good for fantasy points, and Wilson has the tools to hit the ground running this season.
  • Christian Ponder, QB, Vikings   — With Adrian Peterson not at full strength to start the year, the Vikings might finally let Ponder run the show.

Running Backs

  • Jonathan Dwyer, RB, Steelers   — Between Redman and Dwyer, I’d rather own Dwyer.
  • Robert Turbin, RB, Seahawks   — Seattle has a great run game, and Turbin’s in line for a heavy workload if Lynch misses time or isn’t as effective as he was last year.
  • Kendall Hunter, RB, 49ers   — Until we see how carries are split for San Francisco, I’ll take a chance on Hunter emerging in 2012.
  • Bilal Powell, RB, Jets   — If you believe that Shonn Greene will be ineffective this year, you should invest in Powell.

Wide Receivers

  • Austin Collie, WR, Colts   — Collie was shaping up to be Luck’s No. 1 receiver until his concussion scare this preseason.
  • Braylon Edwards, WR, Seahawks   — Everyone forgets about the veteran receiver that Seattle didn’t cut before Week 1.
  • Randy Moss, WR, 49ers   — Even in a rotation with Mario Manningham, Moss is worth stashing just in case being named the starter means something in San Francisco.

Tight Ends

  • Kyle Rudolph, TE, Vikings   — Rudolph could join the elite this year as Ponder’s favorite target.

Is Dallas Cowboys WR Kevin Ogletree 2012′s Laurent Robinson?

After 8 catches, 114 yards, and 2 touchdowns against the Giants, you might be rushing out to claim Kevin Ogletree  on the waiver wire as this year’s Laurent Robinson. Not so fast.

While he’s certainly proven he can perform when called upon, Ogletree’s been on the Cowboys’ roster long enough and been named an “emerging star” enough times that I’m forced to doubt he’ll become a factor each and every week for Dallas. It’s still possible one of Dallas’ other options at WR3 emerges this year, and I think Fantasy Buddha is right about injuries to both the Cowboys’ weapons and the Giants’ corners influencing where Romo went with the ball last night.

I’m not saying don’t pick him up…but I wouldn’t expect Robinson numbers of him. At least not until we see him repeat this performance or unless injuries hit the Cowboys’ wide receivers again like they did last year to give Robinson opportunity.

If you’re looking for a bang-or-bust QB2 to stash behind an elite QB1, put a claim in on Russell Wilson. The Seattle offense may not be explosive, but Wilson showed his ability to produce big fantasy weeks this preseason. If he does surprise us all by Cam Newton-ing the first few weeks of the season, you’re going to want to have him on your roster.

As Fantasy Douche explained in his thinking on quarterbacks:

The thing about quarterbacks who will tuck the ball and run is that they’re like a waterbed. Push it down in one spot and it pops up in another. They’ll pass first if they can, but if their receivers are covered or if they’re unsure, they’ll just run and get a first down. It doesn’t take very long to rack up 40 rushing yards when the QB does this.

There’s a lot to like about the rookie quarterback no matter how the Seattle offense comes together. So even if you already have two quarterbacks on your roster, consider stashing Wilson for the first few weeks of the season.

Cam Newton after scoring a touchdown

Takeaways from the 2011 Fantasy Football Season

Cam Newton after scoring a touchdownI pity the fool that doesn’t learn from his past mistakes, and 2011 broke a few of the fantasy football molds.

No Peyton Manning. The Texans made the playoffs. Rex Grossman is good? Okay…for a few weeks, he was good. And let’s not forget Reggie Bush was a feature back, and Cam Newton was a viable QB1 in his rookie season.

So what are we to make of this?

1. Rookies CAN dominate.

We can no longer claim that a rookie skill player won’t be a factor in their first season. Whether quarterback, wide receiver, running back or tight end, we’ve now seen rookies not only play well but absolutely dominate.

Cam Newton, A.J. Green, Julio Jones, and DeMarco Murray will convince fantasy managers to invest in rookies like Trent Richardson and Robert Griffin III this season, and we can’t say they’re foolish for doing so.

2. The Gronk Rule: Tight ends MIGHT not be deep anymore.

The tight end position was considered deep in recent years, and many experts advised you to ignore Antonio Gates and wait on the TE position in your fantasy football draft. Then Gronkowski happened. He was an absolutely unstoppable force for most NFL tacklers and set records at the tight end position across the board.

With Gronk and Jimmy Graham separating themselves from the rest of the tight end pack so significantly last season, it forces us to consider drafting one of those two in the early rounds to get a jump on the other team in our league out of the tight end spot. If you do, I’ve already covered which tight end I favor.

Some of you may draft a tight end and a quarterback this year before you even have a running back on the roster. That’s just how much the tight end values changed in 2011.

In fact, Gronk’s out of this world stats (as impossible to repeat as they may be) may impact NFL offenses just as the Wildcat did just a few years ago. We may see the mythical “Wes Welker-like receiver” NFL offenses (other than the Pats) have sought give way to the search for a “Gronk” as part of a tight end tandem.

3. To the Air.

Quarterbacks matter more than ever in the NFL today, and we saw in 2011 that fantasy teams built around an elite passer like Aaron Rodgers or Drew Brees could hang with any team in the league no matter who they were forced to start at running back.

Many fantasy footballers have experimented with drafting a quarterback in the first round with mixed results, but 2011 was the year that strategy paid off for a large portion of the fantasy community.

This year, you’ll have plenty of positions to consider in the first round, not just running back. But outside of the top three picks, you should definitely consider getting an elite passer.

I doubt we’ll see many teams make it to the fantasy football playoffs in 2012 without an elite fantasy quarterback on their roster.

4. Always Be Closing.

Despite a hot start, Matthew Stafford and Calvin Johnson cooled off a bit at the end of the season. That’s not necessarily to say anything about their play in 2011 as much as it is to remind us all how important it is to constantly be looking for trade opportunities to help our team.

This year, I’m going to be a little more aggressive about trading players, regardless of status, when a deal comes together. And if the value is there, I may look to unload players who have particularly difficult late season schedules before I am forced to ride out their dry spell.

4. Darren McFadden is worth the risk

I’ve been too concerned about injury to consider Run DMC in drafts prior to 2011, but his performance up until his injury last season has changed my mind. The same might go for Ryan Mathews, even though he’s already hurt again.

As long as you fortify your roster with strong backups at running back, it’s worth considering taking the plunge on these injury risk studs.

5. Handcuffs are a worthy investment.

On that same note, I’ve often avoided guys who were stuck behind studs because I didn’t think it was very likely they’d see the field. I’ve always preferred players that were more likely to get a shot to shine or had a better chance of starting for me multiple weeks throughout the season.

Not so much anymore.

With the injuries last season, owners of Felix Jones, Michael Bush, and C.J. Spiller really reaped the rewards of holding onto  a handcuff all season long. When it comes to running backs, as long as the offensive line is solid, it’s worth investing in a handcuff here and there, whether you own the starter or not, in case we see injuries like we did in 2011.

6. Inconsistency kills.

It’s not necessarily a new lesson, but the Jacksons (Vincent and DeSean) had their ups and downs in 2011. Both were drafted as top receivers, but on any given Sunday, they were as likely to score 30 as they were to score 3 fantasy points.

It’s hard to win a league when you can’t put a solid week together. So even though VJax won me more than one game last season with his phenomenal performances, I’m looking at consistency in 2012 — at the players that give me a chance to win each and every week.

There is a lot of depth at the wide receiver position this year, but don’t fall in love with 2011 total points without considering what they really did each week of last year.